Cheese Factory? Someone must sell the cheese!

In a recent post we learned that the town of Shirland, IL in 1881 had a great volume of milk production and opened a cheese making plant: CLICK HERE

As a dairy farmer, Henry Pollock was quoted in the article by saying his cows would net him $50/head that season which seemed to be above the norm for that time.

But taking this story a step further from dairy production >>> cheese making, we learn that one of the salesmen was none other than Ephraim Powell whose son was married to Henry’s daughter.

The April 1, 1881 Rockton Herald reported that Ephraim “disposed of several cheeses made at the Shirland factory during the month of February.  It is considered a very good article for the season.” (I take it to mean that he sold the cheese, not threw it out).  Just a brief time after this was reported, a “cheese convention” was held at the factory to elect officers for the coming year and to appoint salesmen that included Ephraim Powell.

Click to return to Henry’s page / Click to return to Ephraim’s page

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Lots of milk? Build a cheese factory!

Shirland Items. as found in the Rockton Herald February 18, 1881
Shirland, Feb. 4th, 1881
We see by reading your paper that there is some talk of building a cheese factory in your town, if there should be any doubt as to its being a judicious investment, it might be somewhat interesting to look at a statement furnished us by Mr. E. S. Kizer, proprietor of the Shirland factory, as taken from his books.  They show the receipts of 921,955lbs. of milk during a period of seven months, ending with November last.  The product in cheese is 93.474lbs. requiring a trifle less than 10lbs. of milk to the pound of full cream cheese.  This amount of cheese sold readily at 12 cents, net, at the factory.  On the First of December last Mr. Kizer commenced to manufacture what is called “skims”.  He skims to the amount of 2?lbs. of  butter from one hundred weight of milk.  The milk is then made into what is called half-skinned cheese, which requires a trifle over ten pounds of milk for a ounce of cheese. The butter has all been sold at an average of a little above twenty-five cents net, to the patrons at the factory, and the “half-skins” are all sold up to Feb. 1st, at ten cents at the factory, which makes the patrons very well satisfied with the results of the past season.  W. H. Pollock says that his cows will net him for the season fifty-dollars per head.  What and where is the investment that pays a better percent than cows at say from $25 to $40 per head, which pay their cost in six months.  Mr. Kizer intends to build an addition to his factory in the spring as the increase in his business requires more room.  His machinery pertaining to the factory is all nearly or quite new and in perfect order and he has given entire satisfaction to his patrons he may expect to do a big business the coming season.

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May marks high in Deportment

May Pollock attended Beloit High School in Wisconsin.

May Pollock Powell as a teenager

May Pollock Powell as a teenager

Her teacher was A. F. Rote. Here is one of her report cards that indicates she did quite well in school that year.  Her highest marks were in Deportment*.  Her mother, Phebe Pollock, signed almost all months.  Notice that were were only 5 months of school.

Scan 6 Scan 7

*defined by Merriam-Webster as the manner in which one conducts oneself :  behavior

Something you can cook – Successfully

Within this little book,
Wherever you may look,
Is something you can cook-
Successfully.

The recipes you try
Are fine, you’ll not deny,
We know you can rely
Upon them.

We also recommendshirland cookbook title page
Each advertising friend
The service he can lend
Will please you.

Quite a task we undertook
In publishing this book
We rummage sales forsook
To do it.

The dollars which we need,
To make our work proceed,
Has made us all agreed
Upon it.

But success is always due
To many – not a few.
Our thanks, sincere and true
We give to ALL of you
Who helped us.

May Powell made several contributions to the Shirland Cook Book.  This book was sponsored by EARNEST WORKERS in 1939, to raise money for this group in the small Illinois town of Shirland.  The 2 recipes she provided were Parker House Rolls and Pin Wheel Cookies.

parker house rolls shirland cookbook pin wheel cookies shirland cookbook

Click for more about May

Family of Samuel Powell / Chapter V of “The Powell Family” book published 1906

Check out other posts about Samuel and Sarah

CHAPTER V SAMUEL POWELL AND FAMILY

Samuel Powell, son of Thomas Powell, was born in Frederick county, Maryland, June 5, 1807; died January 2, 1873. Married Sarah Kern about 1834, who died January 10, 1892. He was a farmer and soon after marriage settled on a farm near Freeburg, Ohio, where he lived the remainder of his life. He was successful in business; owning two fair sized farms at the time of his death, which were acquired by hard and continuous labor. He was a loyal member of the M. E. Church. The society at Freeburg was maintained largely by his support and influence. His was the home of the Itinerant. It was a great pleasure to him, on quarterly meeting occasions, to have a large number of the brethren from the other appointments to go home with him for dinner, twenty or more being thus entertained at one time. He fell into line with the Republican party at its organization and continued a faithful adherent. Of the ten children born to them, all lived and raised families and built up homes of their own. His Widow, who survived him nineteen years, after the loss by fire of the house on the old home farm, moved to Marlboro, Ohio, where she lived until called to her eternal home. The old family Bible, with its records, was burned in the house.

(A) Elizabeth Powell, daughter of Samuel Powell, was born February 13, 1835. Married Lawrence Richter (who was born in Holland) April 19, 1860; died April 19, 1905. Mr. Richter was a blacksmith. They lived for a short time after marriage on her father’s farm and he worked at his trade. When Lincoln called for troops in 1861 he enlisted for three years in Co. K, 43d Regiment O.V. I. He re-enlisted and continued in the service until the close of the war. After his discharge he lived some time in the old neighborhood, then moved to Alliance, where they lived several years. From thence they moved to Sterling, Michigan, and later to a farm near Augress, same State, where he died. The widow continues to live on the old farm. The family are in fellowship with the Methodists and affiliate with the Republican party politically. Eight children were born of this union:

(a) Cora E. Richter—Born January 28, 1861. Married Oliver Fibado September 4, 1878. He is a teamster and they live in Bay City, Michigan. Twelve children were born to this union:

(1) Albert Fibado.—Born October 18, 1879. Married Hilda Yaher April 25, 1905.
(2) James A.—Born February 20, 1881; died May 24, 1891.
(3) Olive D. October 31,1882. Married Walter Schaff May 3, 1905. They live in Detroit, Michigan.
(4) Maggie B. February 26, 1885; died June 7, 1891.
(5) Arthur April 18, 1887; died March 1, 1888.
(6) Ida January 28, 1889; died November 1, 1891.
(7) Dora A. Born December 8, 1890.
(8) Rosa April 20, 1892.
(9) Clarence July 14, 1895.
(10) Florence July 13, 1897.
(11) Infant born January 27, 1900.
(12) Elma January 25, 1902: died in infancy.

(b) Emma J. Richter.—Born June 21, 1862. Married Fernando Cookson November 3, 1878. He is a carpenter and they live in Seattle, Washington. Seven children born to them:

(1) E. Minnie.~Born March 5, 1880. Married Charles W. Butterworth September 5, 1904. Live in Seattle, Washington. One son, William C., born September 5, 1905.
(2) Evelyn—Born March 27, 1884. Married Marion R. Thornton July 25, 1900. He is street car conductor and lives in Seattle, Washington. Two sons born to them: Albert, born June 18, 1901; and Fernando E, born October 6, 1903.
(3) Fernando—Born October 10, 1882; died April 4, 1883.
(4) Gertrude—Born January 4, 1886; died February 4, 1886.
(5) Leonard—Born July 15, 1889.
(6) Goldie F.—Born August 8, 1891.
(7) Emma J.——Born January 24, 1894.

(c) Sarah L. Richter.——Born October 9, 1866; died April 19, 1869.

(d) Ida M. Richter.—Born April 21, 1868. Married John Morris June 11, 1895. He is a farmer and they live at Dyra, Tennessee; They had four children; three dead and one living: (1) Earl Morris.

(e) Charles W. Richter.—Born September 2, 1870

(f) William M. Richter.—Born August 11, 1872. Married Sophia Burrister July 22, 1902. He is a sailor on the lakes. Their home is at Augress, Mich.

(g) Franklin S. Richter Born July 12, 1875. He married Coreen Martin and they have four children. He is a brakeman on the railroad and lives in Wisconsin.

(h) Benjamin P. Richter.——A twin brother of Franklin. Married Carrie Burrister June 29, 1905. He is a sailor and they live at Augress, Michigan.

(B) William Powell, son of Samuel Powell, was born April 26, 1836; died January 29, 1897. He married Lydia Lower January 28, 1858. He was a farmer and lived near Freeburg, Ohio, for a few years, operating a threshing machine in connection with farm work. He afterward bought a farm near Harrisburg, Stark county. About 1885 he took the contract to build the union school-house in Marlboro; That he might be near his work he moved to the village. Later he bought the property in which he had moved and lived there the remainder of his days. His widow still occupies the same house. He was a man of unusual strength and endurance, and seemed to have a delight in doing a little more than the ordinary. This peculiarity may have been the cause of the paralysis that finally ended his life. From early life he was a Methodist, and was loyal to the interests of the church.

His Wife and children are also members of the same church. He and his sons all staunch Republicans.

Five children were born of this union:

(a) Amanda .T.—Born May 23, 1859. Married H. C. Holibough October 11, 1877. They lived a number of years near Marlboro, Ohio, where Mr. H. was engaged in the fruit and nursery business. Later they moved to New Berlin, Ohio, Where he is engaged in the manufacture of cigars. They are members of the Christian Church and he is a Republican. Two children born to them: (1) Infant; (2) Robert M., born December 18, 1878. Married Wilda M. Snyder October 20, 1901. He is a farmer and lives near New Berlin, Ohio. A daughter, Bula, was born to them May 28, 1902; also an infant.

(b) John C.—-Born February 22, 1861. Married Sarah C. Bixler November 8, 1883. He is a farmer and has lived near Marlboro about all his life. Six children were born to these parents:

(1) Chloe E., born October 16, 1886: died in infancy, (2) Florence, born October 21, 1888; died in infancy (3) Irma L., born March 3, 1890 (4) Infant. (5) Howard W., born April 6, 1897; and (6) Hazel, born April 18, 1904.

(c) David June 30, 1863. Married Minnie Speelman November 25, 1885, who died April 18, 1891. He married Hattie Hively December 8, 1892. He is a farmer and has lived all his life in Marlboro township, Stark county, Ohio. A daughter, (1) Alvira L., born July 1, 1887, and a son, (2) Roy H., born December 8, 1889, are the fruit of first marriage. To the second union two Infants (3) (4) died; and two sons, (5) Raymond, born June 24, 1901, died April 9, 1902; and (6) Kenneth, born August 28, 1904, were given.

(d) Charles January 1, 1869. Married Elizabeth Brown October 4,1888. He is also a farmer and lives near Marlboro, Ohio.. Four sons bless this home: (1) Walter W., born February 9, 1889; (2) Clyde R, born October 31, 1890; (3) Ralph H., born September 4, 1894; and Russell L., born October 30, 1898..

(e) Phebe September 18, 1875. Married Delbert Hazen September 27, 1893. He is a farmer and lives near Marlboro, Ohio. The family are Methodists. Four children were born to them: (1) Walter M., born October 30, 1895; (2) Infant, born October 7, 1896; (3) Mabel. born August 24, 1897; and (4) Mildred, born October 2, 1900.

(C) David, son of Samuel Powell, was born November 25, 1837. Married Catharine Knoll March 7, 1861, who died January 28, 1898. He married Sarah A. Gibbens April 2, 1903. After his marriage he farmed and ran a threshing machine in the home neighborhood. In 1865 he moved to Marshall county, Indiana, near Bourbon, where he bought eighty acres of timber land and, as he says, “cut a hole in it and built a plank house. He then proceeded to clear the timber, deriving considerable income from sale of lumber. In 1869 he sold out and bought a cleared farm near by. In 1870 he bought an interest in a threshing machine, which he helped run, along with his farming, for twelve years. In 1882 he exchanged his farm near Bourbon for one of 200 acres near Plymouth, the county seat of same county, where he lived until 1901, when he returned to Bourbon township and farmed four years. The second marriage took place in the mean time. In March, 1905, he rented the farm and located in Bourbon, where he lives a retired life, enjoying the fruit of his labor, being in comfortable circumstances. With his happy, cheerful disposition, he should live many more years to help those around him by his neighborly kindness. He has always been “a red-hot” Republican. Two sons and a daughter were born of his first marriage:

(a) Charles July 21, 1863. Married Ida I Dill June 1; 1893, who was a successful teacher in the public schools. Began teaching at the early age of fifteen and taught thirty-four terms previous to marriage. Mr. P. has been employed at farming and operating threshing machines and a saw-mill ever since he was twenty years old. He is now giving more attention to the lumber business. He belongs to K. O. T. M. and I. O. O. F. orders, holding important official relations to both. He has succeeded in business and is in good financial standing, having quite considerable real and personal property. He lives near Bourbon, Indiana. Two sons were born to them: (1) Infant, born May 31, 1894; and (2) Lorie C., born December 6, 1898.

(b) Sarah L.—Born May 21, 1865; died February 15, 1872.

(c) William F.—Born October 14. 1872. Married Luella Moore April 15, 1900. Engaged in farming and threshing and is prospering. Live near Bourbon, Indiana. A daughter, (1) Vera, was born to them June 5, 1903.

(D) Ephraim, son of Samuel Powell, was born February 15, 1839. Married Nancy Geary of Homeworth, Ohio, August 5, 1862. He enlisted August 16, 1862, in Co. I, 115th Regiment O. V. I. His company was on detached duty most of the time, participating only in the battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and some minor engagements along Stone River. Was mustered out July 5, 1865. A few days after reaching home he went to Winnebago county, Illinois, Where his wife had preceded him, and bought a farm of eighty acres near Rockton. They lived on this farm three years, then sold it and bought one of 160 acres near by, which he still owns. Two years later he moved to Chicago and was in business there five years. Then returned to the farm, where he now lives a retired life, his youngest son having assumed the management of the farm; He began a religious life at an early age and united with the church of his father’s, in which he has held an official relation much of the time, being class leader at this writing. Mrs. P. was also a Methodist before her marriage. As a result of their Christian living they are made to rejoice in seeing their children accept Christ and come into the church fold. They are fully awake on the temperance question, and so vote Prohibition. Three sons and a daughter live to comfort their parents.

(a) Parker S. – Born September 27, 1866. Married Adella Collins March 26, 1890. In addition to the public school he attended select school in Rockford two years, then for a short time attended the business college at same place. When of age he entered the office of a machine shop at Rockford as book-keeper, and holds his place still, at a good salary. A son, (1) Harold, born in 1892, and a. daughter, (2) Daisy born in 1895, bring sunshine to this home.

(b) Hattie E. – Born February 7, 1871. Married Mathew Graham April 10, 1891, who died in July of same year. She married Samuel Pollock February 1893. He is a minister of the M. E. Church and at this writing is completing his college work at Evanston, Illinois, where they reside. He is also serving a charge a few miles from the city.

Of the first marriage a son, (1) Mathew was born some months after his father’s death. He lived with his grandparents until thirteen years old, then went to his mother at Evanston and is in school. Two little girls are the fruit of the second marriage: (2) Mary E., born in 1899, and (3) Ruth A., born in 1901.

(c) Dwight E.—Born July 20,1878. Married Mary (sic; May) Pollock October 17, 1901. He attended business college at Rockford two years, then two years at agricultural college at Madison, Wisconsin. He then bought a farm adjoining his father where he now lives. He is chorister in the M. E. Church and also a steward. A son, (1) Alden, born in 1903, gladdens the home.

(d) Fred W. – Born May 29, 1880. Married Myrta Young December 26, 1901. He also attended business college at Rockford and is now farming the home place. He is a member of the M. E. Church and a Prohibitionist. Two children came to them: (1) one dying in infancy, and (2) Leland Parker, born in 1904.

(E) Lovina, daughter of Samuel Powell, born July 5, 1841; died October 28, 1899. She was mar- ried to Henry Paulin September 19, 1861. He enlisted in 1862 in Co. I, 115th Regiment 0. V. 1., and took part with that company as noted in sketch of Ephraim Powell, with Whom he soldiered. The family moved west soon after his discharge, living in Iowa. and Kansas. He was a farmer and now lives in Washta, Iowa. We have failed to secure a sketch of this family, for which we are sorry, and must be content with a simple record. There were born to this union six children:

(a) William June 28, 1862. Married Hester Logan November 25, 1884, who died October 28, 1901. He is a carpenter and lives at Crookston, Minnesota. Six children were born to them: (1) Charles, born December 3. 1885; a farmer and lives at Crookston. (2) Edgar, born February 22, 1887. He is a farmer and lives at Crookston also. (3) Vernroy, born August 1. 1888.

1889 Autograph Book of May Pollock

“Dear May, In memory’s wood-box, drop one stick for me.  Your friend and school-mate, M. K. Armstrong”  (Jordan Prairie, Jan. 3, 1889)

“Dear Cousin,  Not like the rose may our friendship wither but like the evergreen live forever.  Your friend and schoolmate, Eugene Miller”  (January 11, 1889)

“Act well your part / Therein the honor lies.”
Your Sister Cora (Shirland 12/24/1890)

“Dear May, When you are old and cannot see, put on your specs and think of me.”  from your playmate M. ???  “Remember me is all is ask”  (Shirland, Ill Jan 22, 1889)

“Friend May, long may you live, happy may you be, sitting on the wood pile sipping catnip tea.  Your friend, Frankie Dreynmay”  (Shirland, IL  1/5/1889)

Shirland ILL Jan. 6 1889 “My Dear Sister, You ask for something original but where shall I begin for there’s nothing original in me, except originality.
Your loving sister Alice Pollock

“Dear May,  There’s beauty all around our paths;  If but our watchful eyes can trace it midst familiar things and through their lowly guise.  Your schoolmate, Leila.”  (10/1/1891)

“Dear Sister, May your life be long and happy.
Your brother, Samuel” (Jan. 6, 1889)

“Dear Sister, May friendship and truth be with you in youth and catnip and sage cheer up your old age. Your brother, Wilbur” (1/6/1889)

“Friend May,  Kind hearts are the garden, Kind thoughts are the roots, Kind words are the blossoms, Kind deeds are the fruits, Love is the sweetest sunshine that worms into life, for only in darkness grow hatred and strife.  Clarence Miller.”  (Shirland 1/21/1889)

“Dear May, When this you see please think of me and bare in your mind let other say what are they may think not of me in kind. Friend, your loving Sister Clara Pollock.” (1/5/1889 age 10)

“Dear May, As every thread of gold is valuable, so is every minute of time.  Your loving friend, Gertrude McKendall”  (Shirland, 1/25/1889)

Dear May Strive to keep the golden rule and learn your lesson well at school from your brother “Trulie” 4 years old Jan. 1889 (brother Truman)

“Dear May, Every day of your life is a leaf in your history. Try to keep each page free from blot. Your schoolmate and friend Ada Nye.” (1/2/1889; Ada Nye later married May’s brother Wilbur Pollock).

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