Family of Samuel Powell / Chapter V of “The Powell Family” book published 1906

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CHAPTER V SAMUEL POWELL AND FAMILY

Samuel Powell, son of Thomas Powell, was born in Frederick county, Maryland, June 5, 1807; died January 2, 1873. Married Sarah Kern about 1834, who died January 10, 1892. He was a farmer and soon after marriage settled on a farm near Freeburg, Ohio, where he lived the remainder of his life. He was successful in business; owning two fair sized farms at the time of his death, which were acquired by hard and continuous labor. He was a loyal member of the M. E. Church. The society at Freeburg was maintained largely by his support and influence. His was the home of the Itinerant. It was a great pleasure to him, on quarterly meeting occasions, to have a large number of the brethren from the other appointments to go home with him for dinner, twenty or more being thus entertained at one time. He fell into line with the Republican party at its organization and continued a faithful adherent. Of the ten children born to them, all lived and raised families and built up homes of their own. His Widow, who survived him nineteen years, after the loss by fire of the house on the old home farm, moved to Marlboro, Ohio, where she lived until called to her eternal home. The old family Bible, with its records, was burned in the house.

(A) Elizabeth Powell, daughter of Samuel Powell, was born February 13, 1835. Married Lawrence Richter (who was born in Holland) April 19, 1860; died April 19, 1905. Mr. Richter was a blacksmith. They lived for a short time after marriage on her father’s farm and he worked at his trade. When Lincoln called for troops in 1861 he enlisted for three years in Co. K, 43d Regiment O.V. I. He re-enlisted and continued in the service until the close of the war. After his discharge he lived some time in the old neighborhood, then moved to Alliance, where they lived several years. From thence they moved to Sterling, Michigan, and later to a farm near Augress, same State, where he died. The widow continues to live on the old farm. The family are in fellowship with the Methodists and affiliate with the Republican party politically. Eight children were born of this union:

(a) Cora E. Richter—Born January 28, 1861. Married Oliver Fibado September 4, 1878. He is a teamster and they live in Bay City, Michigan. Twelve children were born to this union:

(1) Albert Fibado.—Born October 18, 1879. Married Hilda Yaher April 25, 1905.
(2) James A.—Born February 20, 1881; died May 24, 1891.
(3) Olive D. October 31,1882. Married Walter Schaff May 3, 1905. They live in Detroit, Michigan.
(4) Maggie B. February 26, 1885; died June 7, 1891.
(5) Arthur April 18, 1887; died March 1, 1888.
(6) Ida January 28, 1889; died November 1, 1891.
(7) Dora A. Born December 8, 1890.
(8) Rosa April 20, 1892.
(9) Clarence July 14, 1895.
(10) Florence July 13, 1897.
(11) Infant born January 27, 1900.
(12) Elma January 25, 1902: died in infancy.

(b) Emma J. Richter.—Born June 21, 1862. Married Fernando Cookson November 3, 1878. He is a carpenter and they live in Seattle, Washington. Seven children born to them:

(1) E. Minnie.~Born March 5, 1880. Married Charles W. Butterworth September 5, 1904. Live in Seattle, Washington. One son, William C., born September 5, 1905.
(2) Evelyn—Born March 27, 1884. Married Marion R. Thornton July 25, 1900. He is street car conductor and lives in Seattle, Washington. Two sons born to them: Albert, born June 18, 1901; and Fernando E, born October 6, 1903.
(3) Fernando—Born October 10, 1882; died April 4, 1883.
(4) Gertrude—Born January 4, 1886; died February 4, 1886.
(5) Leonard—Born July 15, 1889.
(6) Goldie F.—Born August 8, 1891.
(7) Emma J.——Born January 24, 1894.

(c) Sarah L. Richter.——Born October 9, 1866; died April 19, 1869.

(d) Ida M. Richter.—Born April 21, 1868. Married John Morris June 11, 1895. He is a farmer and they live at Dyra, Tennessee; They had four children; three dead and one living: (1) Earl Morris.

(e) Charles W. Richter.—Born September 2, 1870

(f) William M. Richter.—Born August 11, 1872. Married Sophia Burrister July 22, 1902. He is a sailor on the lakes. Their home is at Augress, Mich.

(g) Franklin S. Richter Born July 12, 1875. He married Coreen Martin and they have four children. He is a brakeman on the railroad and lives in Wisconsin.

(h) Benjamin P. Richter.——A twin brother of Franklin. Married Carrie Burrister June 29, 1905. He is a sailor and they live at Augress, Michigan.

(B) William Powell, son of Samuel Powell, was born April 26, 1836; died January 29, 1897. He married Lydia Lower January 28, 1858. He was a farmer and lived near Freeburg, Ohio, for a few years, operating a threshing machine in connection with farm work. He afterward bought a farm near Harrisburg, Stark county. About 1885 he took the contract to build the union school-house in Marlboro; That he might be near his work he moved to the village. Later he bought the property in which he had moved and lived there the remainder of his days. His widow still occupies the same house. He was a man of unusual strength and endurance, and seemed to have a delight in doing a little more than the ordinary. This peculiarity may have been the cause of the paralysis that finally ended his life. From early life he was a Methodist, and was loyal to the interests of the church.

His Wife and children are also members of the same church. He and his sons all staunch Republicans.

Five children were born of this union:

(a) Amanda .T.—Born May 23, 1859. Married H. C. Holibough October 11, 1877. They lived a number of years near Marlboro, Ohio, where Mr. H. was engaged in the fruit and nursery business. Later they moved to New Berlin, Ohio, Where he is engaged in the manufacture of cigars. They are members of the Christian Church and he is a Republican. Two children born to them: (1) Infant; (2) Robert M., born December 18, 1878. Married Wilda M. Snyder October 20, 1901. He is a farmer and lives near New Berlin, Ohio. A daughter, Bula, was born to them May 28, 1902; also an infant.

(b) John C.—-Born February 22, 1861. Married Sarah C. Bixler November 8, 1883. He is a farmer and has lived near Marlboro about all his life. Six children were born to these parents:

(1) Chloe E., born October 16, 1886: died in infancy, (2) Florence, born October 21, 1888; died in infancy (3) Irma L., born March 3, 1890 (4) Infant. (5) Howard W., born April 6, 1897; and (6) Hazel, born April 18, 1904.

(c) David June 30, 1863. Married Minnie Speelman November 25, 1885, who died April 18, 1891. He married Hattie Hively December 8, 1892. He is a farmer and has lived all his life in Marlboro township, Stark county, Ohio. A daughter, (1) Alvira L., born July 1, 1887, and a son, (2) Roy H., born December 8, 1889, are the fruit of first marriage. To the second union two Infants (3) (4) died; and two sons, (5) Raymond, born June 24, 1901, died April 9, 1902; and (6) Kenneth, born August 28, 1904, were given.

(d) Charles January 1, 1869. Married Elizabeth Brown October 4,1888. He is also a farmer and lives near Marlboro, Ohio.. Four sons bless this home: (1) Walter W., born February 9, 1889; (2) Clyde R, born October 31, 1890; (3) Ralph H., born September 4, 1894; and Russell L., born October 30, 1898..

(e) Phebe September 18, 1875. Married Delbert Hazen September 27, 1893. He is a farmer and lives near Marlboro, Ohio. The family are Methodists. Four children were born to them: (1) Walter M., born October 30, 1895; (2) Infant, born October 7, 1896; (3) Mabel. born August 24, 1897; and (4) Mildred, born October 2, 1900.

(C) David, son of Samuel Powell, was born November 25, 1837. Married Catharine Knoll March 7, 1861, who died January 28, 1898. He married Sarah A. Gibbens April 2, 1903. After his marriage he farmed and ran a threshing machine in the home neighborhood. In 1865 he moved to Marshall county, Indiana, near Bourbon, where he bought eighty acres of timber land and, as he says, “cut a hole in it and built a plank house. He then proceeded to clear the timber, deriving considerable income from sale of lumber. In 1869 he sold out and bought a cleared farm near by. In 1870 he bought an interest in a threshing machine, which he helped run, along with his farming, for twelve years. In 1882 he exchanged his farm near Bourbon for one of 200 acres near Plymouth, the county seat of same county, where he lived until 1901, when he returned to Bourbon township and farmed four years. The second marriage took place in the mean time. In March, 1905, he rented the farm and located in Bourbon, where he lives a retired life, enjoying the fruit of his labor, being in comfortable circumstances. With his happy, cheerful disposition, he should live many more years to help those around him by his neighborly kindness. He has always been “a red-hot” Republican. Two sons and a daughter were born of his first marriage:

(a) Charles July 21, 1863. Married Ida I Dill June 1; 1893, who was a successful teacher in the public schools. Began teaching at the early age of fifteen and taught thirty-four terms previous to marriage. Mr. P. has been employed at farming and operating threshing machines and a saw-mill ever since he was twenty years old. He is now giving more attention to the lumber business. He belongs to K. O. T. M. and I. O. O. F. orders, holding important official relations to both. He has succeeded in business and is in good financial standing, having quite considerable real and personal property. He lives near Bourbon, Indiana. Two sons were born to them: (1) Infant, born May 31, 1894; and (2) Lorie C., born December 6, 1898.

(b) Sarah L.—Born May 21, 1865; died February 15, 1872.

(c) William F.—Born October 14. 1872. Married Luella Moore April 15, 1900. Engaged in farming and threshing and is prospering. Live near Bourbon, Indiana. A daughter, (1) Vera, was born to them June 5, 1903.

(D) Ephraim, son of Samuel Powell, was born February 15, 1839. Married Nancy Geary of Homeworth, Ohio, August 5, 1862. He enlisted August 16, 1862, in Co. I, 115th Regiment O. V. I. His company was on detached duty most of the time, participating only in the battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and some minor engagements along Stone River. Was mustered out July 5, 1865. A few days after reaching home he went to Winnebago county, Illinois, Where his wife had preceded him, and bought a farm of eighty acres near Rockton. They lived on this farm three years, then sold it and bought one of 160 acres near by, which he still owns. Two years later he moved to Chicago and was in business there five years. Then returned to the farm, where he now lives a retired life, his youngest son having assumed the management of the farm; He began a religious life at an early age and united with the church of his father’s, in which he has held an official relation much of the time, being class leader at this writing. Mrs. P. was also a Methodist before her marriage. As a result of their Christian living they are made to rejoice in seeing their children accept Christ and come into the church fold. They are fully awake on the temperance question, and so vote Prohibition. Three sons and a daughter live to comfort their parents.

(a) Parker S. – Born September 27, 1866. Married Adella Collins March 26, 1890. In addition to the public school he attended select school in Rockford two years, then for a short time attended the business college at same place. When of age he entered the office of a machine shop at Rockford as book-keeper, and holds his place still, at a good salary. A son, (1) Harold, born in 1892, and a. daughter, (2) Daisy born in 1895, bring sunshine to this home.

(b) Hattie E. – Born February 7, 1871. Married Mathew Graham April 10, 1891, who died in July of same year. She married Samuel Pollock February 1893. He is a minister of the M. E. Church and at this writing is completing his college work at Evanston, Illinois, where they reside. He is also serving a charge a few miles from the city.

Of the first marriage a son, (1) Mathew was born some months after his father’s death. He lived with his grandparents until thirteen years old, then went to his mother at Evanston and is in school. Two little girls are the fruit of the second marriage: (2) Mary E., born in 1899, and (3) Ruth A., born in 1901.

(c) Dwight E.—Born July 20,1878. Married Mary (sic; May) Pollock October 17, 1901. He attended business college at Rockford two years, then two years at agricultural college at Madison, Wisconsin. He then bought a farm adjoining his father where he now lives. He is chorister in the M. E. Church and also a steward. A son, (1) Alden, born in 1903, gladdens the home.

(d) Fred W. – Born May 29, 1880. Married Myrta Young December 26, 1901. He also attended business college at Rockford and is now farming the home place. He is a member of the M. E. Church and a Prohibitionist. Two children came to them: (1) one dying in infancy, and (2) Leland Parker, born in 1904.

(E) Lovina, daughter of Samuel Powell, born July 5, 1841; died October 28, 1899. She was mar- ried to Henry Paulin September 19, 1861. He enlisted in 1862 in Co. I, 115th Regiment 0. V. 1., and took part with that company as noted in sketch of Ephraim Powell, with Whom he soldiered. The family moved west soon after his discharge, living in Iowa. and Kansas. He was a farmer and now lives in Washta, Iowa. We have failed to secure a sketch of this family, for which we are sorry, and must be content with a simple record. There were born to this union six children:

(a) William June 28, 1862. Married Hester Logan November 25, 1884, who died October 28, 1901. He is a carpenter and lives at Crookston, Minnesota. Six children were born to them: (1) Charles, born December 3. 1885; a farmer and lives at Crookston. (2) Edgar, born February 22, 1887. He is a farmer and lives at Crookston also. (3) Vernroy, born August 1. 1888.

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Illini Pest Control (formed in 1939)

Illini Pest Control & Service was formed in 1939 by four entomologists on the faculty and staff of the University of Illinois and the Illinois Natural History Survey. “The entomologists—C.L. Metcalf, Clyde Kearns, William McCauley and Dwight Powell— later became known for other professional contributions. “McCauley, for example, is credited with the idea for pest strips and flea collars.  Kearns did some of the original research on the pesticide chlordane. And Metcalf was co-author of the textbook “Destructive and Useful Insects.” At Illini Pest Control, they employed U. of I. students part time as pest control operators to give them practical experience.

To mark the 60th anniversary of the company, an employee picnic was held at Urbana’s Meadowbrook Park in September 1999.  This was according to The News-Gazette who interviewed Bill Delaplane, the company’s president (85 years old) and Nancy Delaplane, 80, the vice president/secretary.  The Delaplanes’ connection with the business dates back to 1942 when Bill Delaplane—then a University of Illinois graduate student in entomology—was offered a job as full-time manager for the firm.  They purchased the company in 1947.  One of their sons, Gary Delaplane, served as the company’s director of operations from 1987 until his death in 1994. And one of their daughters, Diana E. Delaplane, was general manager as of the year 2000.

The preceding information was taken from “Entomology Newsletter 2000”.  This newsletter was published annually by the Department of Entomology, School of Integrative Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 320 Morrill Hall, 505 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 USA.

The following pictures were taken from a 2’x3′ poster created for the 25th anniversary of the company.  Apparently this poster sat in storage for many years.  It made its way to my Uncle Dwight A. Powell (son of one of the founders Dwight E. Powell Jr.).  He met one of the Delaplane daughters at a medical conference in 2011 and she sent this to him because of how prominently his father is featured in the poster.

This is a 2’x3′ poster created for the company’s 25th anniversary in 1964.

Return to Dwight’s home page.

Smiles and Tears – poems by Sarah Ward Benedict

Smiles and Tears

To the reader:

I trust the poems this book contains will be favorably received, not only by my personal friends, but by the public in general.  The poems are from the heart, as the title which I have given my book will show.  There is a view of sadness tingeing many of my poems, for there has been a great sorrow come into my life, and I cannot always gild my work with sunshine; but in this work I have sometimes, through the love of a Saviour, triumphed over the weight of sorrow that has bound me to the earth.

I have no human aid in my work.  I am also in my home; widowed and childless, and have outlived my three-score and ten years.  God has given me a beautiful gift, and when those soul songs are coming so sweet to me it seems as if the angels must be very near.  Jesus is my helper, and Him will I praise in my song.

-Author

Return to her homepage


Sarah refers to living beyond three-score and ten years which is 70 years.  She lived to be 82 years old and died in 1895. Her husband Elias died in 1881 and her daughter Lucy died in 1882, so the intro to these poems was written sometime between 1882 and 1895.

© Mark Gove, Curating in Sepia Tones, 2012.  All rights are reserved.

Cummings/Steward Wedding newspaper clipping

HOME WEDDING

LAST EVENING

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MISS ELSIE STEWARD AND ROY CUMMINGS MARRIED.

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MANY GUESTS PRESENT

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The marriage of Miss Ida Elsie Steward, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Minard Steward, of 1220 School Street, to Roy B. Cummings of Roscoe, took place last evening at the home of the bride’s parents, in the presence of a large company of friends and relatives.  Invitations to the number of 100 had been issued for the wedding which had its solemnization at 6 o’clock.

The Rev. Frank D. Sheets performed the ceremony in the home being handsomely decorated with asparagus ferns and flowers.  In the parlors and throughout the house the green and white idea prevailed to the strains of Mendelssohn’s wedding march rendered on the piano by Mrs. E. Lowe, the bridal party took their place beneath a bell, done in ferns and holding a shower of rose petals.  Draped from the bell were fourteen white ribbons and at the end of each was a member of the Ab Bea club of which the bride and her sister, Miss Delphine, are members.  At the close of the ceremoney (sic) a tightening of the ribbons loosened the rose leaves which showered the bride.  Misses Bertha Cummings and Delphine Steward, sisters of the bridal couple, were the only attendants.  The parlor of the Steward home had been prettily arranged for the wedding, a bank of palms and Easter lilies being arranged in front of the window and before this stood during the ceremony.  Asparagus fern had been used in profusion in available places about the room.

The bride was attired in a gown of white silk Persian lawn and carried a shower boquet (sic) of bride roses.  Her attendants were attired in white and carried pink roses.

The dining room, where a coallation (sic) was served after the ceremony, was prettily arranged, the same color scheme of green and white being employed.

Mr. and Mrs. Cummings will go to housekeeping at once in the home they have prepared at Roscoe and after May 20 will be at home to friends. Mr. Cummings is with the American Insurance company in that place.  His bride of last evening has been a resident of Rockford for about a year, the family staying here from the farm in _____________.